This is not a hockey story.

Last week RMNB published a two-part translation of an interview Michal Neuvirth gave to the Czech site iSport. Our articles contained translated, controversial quotes about Braden Holtby, Alex Semin, Alex Ovechkin, and Dale Hunter.

The story was picked up by Puck Daddy and The Washington Post, among others. Some of the articles that used our quotes excluded important passages where Neuvirth praised Holtby and Ovechkin, leading to a popular characterization of the interview that I don’t think matched what we published. On the other hand, an article for Sportsnet.ca by Chris Nichols copied our entire translation.

Before long, our translation came under scrutiny. To respond to questions from our audience, I wrote and published a note on our translation process and how much room for interpretation there is in that process, but we did not retract or correct our post. Social media and our own commenters wondered aloud if our articles had mistranslated the original article or if something had been “lost in translation.”

Then Caps senior writer Mike Vogel gave Neuvirth the opportunity to clarify his statements in a video interview:

Vogel: In the translation of that interview coming back to English, you think some things got lost.

Neuvirth: There was some misunderstanding. They changed my meaning a lot. I was talking about the boys in a good way. They translate to the way they want it. I feel like they got nothing to write about right now.

It’s unclear to me if the pronoun they describes RMNB or iSport. Neither Neuvirth or Vogel mention our site by name in the interview.

Neuvirth’s interview made the rounds, boosted by articles on NHL.com and Sportsnet.ca, and our translation seemingly fell into disrepute.

On Thursday, CSN’s Chuck Gormley published an article titled “Neuvirth consider Europe, receives apology” (In naming my source and linking to it, I have given CSN-Washington more consideration than they gave us when they republished our work without attribution). Here’s the relevant passage from Gormley’s article:

Neuvirth said Thursday he was in “big shock” when he saw the translated interview and has since received an apology from editors of the website.

“They told me they made their mistake and they called me and called my agent and apologized, so it’s good,” Neuvirth said.

“Czech sounds totally different. They translated the way they wanted. Like I said, they felt like they got nothing to write about and they wanted it to be more interesting.”

Again, it’s not clear if Neuvirth is talking about RMNB or iSport here. I asked Gormley to clarify the first sentence of this passage, but he did not respond before publication. The Capitals organization has assured me that Neuvirth was referring to the editors of iSport, not Russian Machine Never Breaks.

I’ll be clear: RMNB’s translation of the Neuvirth interview is accurate. We stand by the articles we publish. And while I spoke to Neuvirth’s agent last week about the translation, I did not apologize for it.

The original Czech article, whose editors apologized for it, may have misquoted Neuvirth, but our articles are faithful translations of that original piece.

We have no motive to manufacture quotes or deliberately mistranslate. We are not a part of a publishing network, we do not profit from pageviews, we do not serve advertisements, and we do not earn a living from this site. While to folks like Adrian Dater that may disqualify us from the title of journalist, we’re strangely okay with it. The last time I loaded the original article, iSport served up a 300 x 480 ad for men’s underwear. Cui bono.

We are not incompetent. We twice-verified our translation before publishing, and then we checked it again after our that translation was questioned. No substantive disputes to our translation were ever offered, yet NHL.com and Sportsnet.ca parroted the unfounded conclusion that our work was flawed regardlesss. NHL.com’s Mike Battaglino chose to call us a “fan blog” rather than use our site’s name, which I interpret as a pejorative– to undermine our work, question our motives, and distance sites like RMNB from accredited media.

But our translations were accurate, and our processes ethical. Meanwhile, NHL.com’s Battaglino and Sportsnet.ca’s unnamed mystery author were unstirred by the their own internal hypocrisy alarms when blithely repeating the unsubstantiated claim that our translation was wrong. Neither article mentioned Russian Machine by name.

Unlike the outlets that criticized us, we put in the effort to verify our work before we published it. When more criticisms appeared, we verified again. Finally, I contracted the firm TransPerfect to translate the article. The translator was not given our translation and has no background in hockey. Below I provide key passages from the interview as translated by RMNB and TransPerfect, side by side. At the bottom of this article, I have re-posted their entire unedited translation.

Side-by-Side Comparison

Our translation TransPerfect
It’s true that until now, I have never been an official number one. But I have played just over a hundred games in NHL. That’s nothing. I’m starting the season sure that I want to play forty/fifty games and I am really sure that I have the weakest competition (Braden Holtby) I’ve ever had. I will try to be number one goalie this season. Finally! It is true that until now I have never been considered an undisputed number one. After all I have played just over a hundred games in the NHL, which is really nothing. I’m starting the season with the goal of playing some forty/fifty games again and I am quite certain that this year I have the weakest competition I’ve ever had on my team (a 22-year-old Braden Holtby). I will try to be number one already this year. Finally!
But it’s important to look at which players always were in tandem with me. At first – the Russian [Semyon Varlamov] who was always in front of me because he was drafted higher and played in the NHL sooner. It was hard to get in front of him. But in the end I played much more than he did. Last year, I had Voky (Tomáš Vokoun) next to me and I guessed in advance that he would probably get more space in the goal than I would. I came to camp ready, but it the end the season was as it was… I left it behind and I’m starting the new one ready to fight for my spot. This is the turning-point year in my life; it will decide where will I go on with my career. But it is necessary to look at who was there with me. First it was the Russian Varlamov who was always given priority because he was the first round pick and started playing in the NHL earlier. It was difficult to get ahead of him. Ultimately I got to play much more than he did in the season before last. Last year I had Voky (Tomas Vokoun) by my side and I prepared myself in advance that he will probably get more chances to play. I arrived at the camp prepared, but eventually the season turned out to be what it was… I put it behind me and I am starting this one determined to fight for my spot again. This will be my turning-point year; it will determine my career.
[Vokoun and I] were both really sorry about that. We were angry that neither of us started in the playoffs, there’s no doubt in that. But that’s the life, things like that happen in sports, and we can’t do anything else than to forget about that last season. Voky is going to fight in Pittsburgh and I in Washington. We were both really sad. We were angry that neither of us is playing during play-offs, no doubt about it. But that’s life. Things like that happen in sports and all we can do is to completely forget about the last season. Voky will play at Pittsburgh and I in Washington.
He sure is a great goalie. But I can’t compare him to Voky or Varlamov, that’s what I meant. In comparison to those two, he played nothing in the NHL and that’s why I take him as the weakest of them three. I’m definitely not saying that he is bad, not at all. I actually like the way he plays. But he is the worst of them three, that’s all. He sure is a great goalie, no doubt. But I can’t compare him with Voky or Varlamov, that’s what I meant. Compared to these two he played nothing in the NHL, I simply consider him to be the weakest goalie of them all. I am definitely not saying that he is bad, not at all. I actually like his style. But he is the worst of them, that’s it.
He is a friend, too, of course. I actually always try to be friends with the other goalie, I don’t like to start a fight. We get along with Holtby pretty well, we played together for two years on the farm club. He was my number two there, when we won the Calder Cup twice, so we have known each other for a long time, over four years. We are not such friends to go out for dinner with each other, but we sit next to each other in the locker room and we always chat. But we don’t do “dates.” Sure, he is also a friend, absolutely. I always try to have a good relationship with the other goalie, I never want to cause problems. We have a good relationship with Holtby. We spent two years at the farm. He was my number two there when we won Calder Cup twice. We have known each other for a long time, over four years. We are not close friends who would go out to dinner but our lockers are next to each other and we always chat. But we don’t go out together.
I was the one who advised him to leave for Pittsburgh. I know he had many offers from Russia [Editor’s note: Vokoun had been rumored to be considering joining the reformed Lokomotiv team], but I told him not to go there especially. Just when I was at his place, a few teams contacted him and I told him to go with the Pens. He has a big chance to win the Stanley Cup there. Besides, they told [Pens goalie Marc-Andre Fleury] he will play less, because his last playoffs didn’t really work out as well. Anyway, what’s written on paper in the summer doesn’t mean much, anything can happen during the season. That’s why I am glad Voky signed with Pittsburgh, I think he did the best thing he could. I’m sure his wife and other guys advised him as well, but maybe my opinion helped him decide as well. I was one of those who told him to go to Pittsburgh. I know he had many offers from Russia, but I told him not to go there. Just when I was visiting, a few teams contacted him and I recommended to him to go to Pittsburgh. He has a big chance to win the Stanley Cup there. Besides, Fleury (the no. 1 goalie) was told that he would be playing less, because he wasn’t that great in the play-offs as well. Anyway, what is written in the summer does not mean much; anything can happen during the season. That’s why I am glad that Voky signed with Pittsburgh, I think that was the best thing he could do. I am sure that his wife and other guys were involved in his decision, but maybe my opinion helped him as well.
I see the leaving of Semin as a huge minus for the team, but then again I think it may do some good. He didn’t have the best work ethic. Maybe now when Ovi will be without him, he will put more into hockey. Maybe that’s what the management was going for. I see Semin’s departure as a big loss for the team, but then again I think it may do some good. His work ethic wasn’t the best. Maybe now when Ovi (Alexander Ovechkin) will be without Semin, he could put more into hockey. Maybe that was also what the management intended.
If Semin wanted to, he could have been the best player in the world, but he doesn’t want to every day. And that’s wrong. If Semin wanted he could have been the best player in the world, but he just does not get motivated every day. And that’s wrong.
He isn’t what he used to be, that’s for sure. And if a team like ours wants to have a chance at the Stanley Cup, we need Ovi to be the best. We all expect that from him; he has to be the real leader. But it’s hard you know, he achieved everything as a player. He was on the absolute top, and then one can only fall down. I just hope that Ovi will stop falling and instead stops and maybe tries to get back on top. As for his attitude in the lockerroom, he is still the same guy. Even when it’s not working out for him, he is in a good mood, he celebrates with the others. He is the right team player. He will stay like that forever. He definitely isn’t what he used to be, that true. And if we as a team want to have a chance at the Stanley Cup, we need Ovi to be the best. We all expect it from him; as a captain he has to be a true leader. But it’s hard, as a player he has achieved everything, he was on the very top and then one can only fall down. I just hope that Ovi won’t continue falling; that he stops and maybe will try to get back on the top again. In terms of his attitude and locker room manners he is still the same. Even when he is not doing well, he is still in a good mood and celebrates with others. He is a real team player. He will stay like that forever.
I haven’t met him in person yet, but I spoke with him over the phone and felt good about it. He is definitely a legend of Washington hockey, plus he was an assistant in New Jersey, against which I’ve always played pretty good, so I think he is positive about me. With a new coach, it’s a new beginning and I am happy about Oates. Also because it means Dale Hunter isn’t staying. I haven’t met him in person yet but we talked on the phone and I felt good about it. He certainly is a big legend of Washington hockey, plus he was an assistant coach in New Jersey, against which I always played well, so I think that he has positive impression of me. It’s a new beginning with a new coach and I am happy for Oates. Also because Dale Hunter didn’t stay.
If only because Holtby was number one under him in playoffs. Generally, I didn’t find a way to him. I had good relationships with [Bruce Boudreau] and with the farm-team coach Bob Woods, but not with Hunter. I don’t know, he simply didn’t talk to us goalies at all, I think he criticized us sometimes for no reason. From my point of view, it’s good he left. Simply because Holtby was number one under him in the play-offs. Anyway, he never really made friends with him. He had a good relationship with Bruce (former coach Boudreau) and with the farm coach Bob Woods, but not with Hunter. I don’t know, he simply didn’t communicate with us goalies, in my opinion he also criticized us for nothing. From my standpoint, it is good that he left.

The translations are nearly identical.

Both translations put Braden Holtby’s name in parentheses after the phrase weakest competition. While it may not have been Neuvirth’s intention for the weak competition to describe Holtby, the original article explicitly published it that way– confirmed by two translations. No fault should lie in a translation for accurately communicating its source.

Statements about Holtby, Semin, and Hunter translate the same in both documents, aside for some idiomatic (that’s for sure vs. that’s true) and grammatical (he doesn’t want to vs. he just does not get motivated) differences; none of which change the meaning of the source. The original article, for which the editors have apparently apologized, may not have been accurate in the first place.

Again: RMNB’s translation stands up to independent verification. Any qualms one may have with our translation should instead be directed at the editors of the original article. Our articles are accurate, and there is no seed of doubt here.

Our work reached and surpassed journalistic standards that some of our critics could not meet. Their attempts to marginalize us by omitting our name (and by extension our deserved attribution) or dismiss us as amateurs amount to nothing but feckless bullying. It’s the big media lashing out against small because they feel threatened. It’s the paid professionals picking on volunteers because they can.

But none of those paid professionals checked the facts. None of them contacted us about the process of the translation. Instead, they refused to verify the claims they so dutifully stenographed, and they slighted the hard work put forth by bloggers like Karolina Martinková of hockey-on.blogspot.cz. Karolina is owed an apology.

RMNB serves its readers and no one else. We take seriously our responsibility to them, and the standards we commit ourselves to will honor that responsibility– regardless if we’re publishing a translated interview or a five-part series celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Mighty Ducks (we’re totally doing that next month).

Full Text of the TransPerfect Translation

Neuvirth, Capitals goalie: I told Voky to take it in Pittsburgh

Michal Neuvirth wants to become number one in Washington this year. And he is not afraid of the last year play-off miracle Braden Holtby

INTERVIEW | Don’t mistake his self-confidence for cockiness. The goalie, Michal Neuvirth, is just not afraid of talking about things the way they are. He knows that the last season during which he was supposed to rock with his countryman Tomas Vokoun did not turn out too well. But he has no doubts that this time the Washington Capitals crease will be exclusively his. “In all the years I have been here I have the weakest competition,” he claims about the last play-off miracle Holtby.

Before he flew back to the US, he got to run a lot. Except because of stomach problems it was somewhat different than was actually needed within summer training. Even during the visit to his grandma, Michal Neuvirth had to watch his feasting… “Luckily I managed to have the classic Czech dishes beforehand; without them I would not be able to survive the summer,” admits the 24-year-old goaltender.

Has the stomach virus severely affected your training?

“I have definitely lost some time, after all I did nothing for a week and even afterwards I felt somewhat weaker. But I still have a month before the training camp, I have plenty of time. Moreover I have already left for America and I was already on the ice on Thursday. I left for the US this early already last year and it helped me; I had a good camp and was well prepared. I have a fitness trainer here and more players arrive every week. Also I don’t have a good place to practice in the Czech Republic; summer is more difficult for a goaltender.”

Soon you may not have a place to play. Are you interested in the looming NHL lockout?

“To tell the truth I don’t follow all these negotiations too closely. But I firmly believe that the season will start as planned and everything will be settled. I don’t have a plan B for now in case there is no league, but I know that I am still a Sparta player, so I would probably return home.”

When would you start dealing with plan B?

“We can practice in Washington until the fifteenth of September when the existing collective agreement expires. If a new agreement is not signed I will have to quickly find a team which I could join. I would certainly figure it out in a few days, because I would want to play and not just wait until the NHL starts. We would jump on it with my agent and I would be willing to get on a plane immediately and go to Europe, no problem.”

When the league starts you will be fighting for the position of Capitals’ starting goalie. In past years you were not able to hold this position permanently. What are your prospects this time?

“It is true that until now I have never been considered an undisputed number one. After all I have played just over a hundred games in the NHL, which is really nothing. I’m starting the season with the goal of playing some forty/fifty games again and I am quite certain that this year I have the weakest competition I’ve ever had on my team (a 22-year-old Braden Holtby). I will try to be number one already this year. Finally!”

They say in America that you have always been a bridesmaid in Washington crease and not the bride. That it is always your colleague who is number one, no matter who it is. How do you see it?

“But it is necessary to look at who was there with me. First it was the Russian Varlamov who was always given priority because he was the first round pick and started playing in the NHL earlier. It was difficult to get ahead of him. Ultimately I got to play much more than he did in the season before last. Last year I had Voky (Tomas Vokoun) by my side and I prepared myself in advance that he will probably get more chances to play. I arrived at the camp prepared, but eventually the season turned out to be what it was… I put it behind me and I am starting this one determined to fight for my spot again. This will be my turning-point year; it will determine my career.”

But the last season was disappointing. Together with Tomas Vokoun, as the Czech tandem, you were supposed to make the push for Stanley Cup and instead neither of you played at the play-offs…

“Well, this was the worst possible outcome. But as the saying goes, something good always comes from something bad and that’s how I take it. At least I had great fun with Voky. I got to know him as a human being, I watched him getting ready, how he trains, what he does before the game and this really helped me a lot. We really became quite close, we are still in touch. My girlfriend and I visited him for a couple of days in Florida when the season ended. We became very good friends.”

This I understand. But what about the hockey side? We had ups and downs, then we both got injured and Braden Holtby, a youngster from the farm, took over completely.

“We were both really sad. We were angry that neither of us is playing during play-offs, no doubt about it. But that’s life. Things like that happen in sports and all we can do is to completely forget about the last season. Voky will play at Pittsburgh and I in Washington.”

You just mentioned that you have the weakest competition in Holtby you’ve ever had. According to the last play-offs it does seem that way. He was awesome, don’t you think so?

“He sure is a great goalie, no doubt. But I can’t compare him with Voky or Varlamov, that’s what I meant. Compared to these two he played nothing in the NHL, I simply consider him to be the weakest goalie of them all. I am definitely not saying that he is bad, not at all. I actually like his style. But he is the worst of them, that’s it.”

Aren’t you worried about how perfect he was in the play-offs? That he would get a better chance?

“I am not worried. I think that a year ago I played in the play-offs the same as he did this time. They always say that the second season is the turning point, so I am curious how he will do…”

I wonder, what is your relationship with Holtby outside of hockey? Do you get along?

“Sure, he is also a friend, absolutely. I always try to have a good relationship with the other goalie, I never want to cause problems. We have a good relationship with Holtby. We spent two years at the farm. He was my number two there when we won Calder Cup twice. We have known each other for a long time, over four years. We are not close friends who would go out to dinner but our lockers are next to each other and we always chat. But we don’t go out together.”

Your recent seasons have been affected by injuries, mainly muscular. Do you do anything to avoid them?

“Absolutely. This is something I concentrate on in the summer. I try to strengthen the areas that were hurting after a demanding part of the season. But last year it was different, I felt well prepared the whole time and then a player fell on me when I was in a split. You can practice all you want but you can’t avoid getting injured in such situations.”
Michal Neuvirth just got a goal from Matt Moulson, celebrating on the left is his team player Islander John Tavares

Back to Vokoun. How do you view his departure to Pittsburgh?

“I was one of those who told him to go to Pittsburgh. I know he had many offers from Russia, but I told him not to go there. Just when I was visiting, a few teams contacted him and I recommended to him to go to Pittsburgh. He has a big chance to win the Stanley Cup there. Besides, Fleury (the no. 1 goalie) was told that he would be playing less, because he wasn’t that great in the play-offs as well. Anyway, what is written in the summer does not mean much; anything can happen during the season. That’s why I am glad that Voky signed with Pittsburgh, I think that was the best thing he could do. I am sure that his wife and other guys were involved in his decision, but maybe my opinion helped him as well.”

Vokoun wasn’t the only one who left Washington, it was also the Russian forward Alexander Semin, quite a controversial player. Some people claim that it will help the club, others say it won’t. What do you think?

“I am somewhere in between. I see Semin’s departure as a big loss for the team, but then again I think it may do some good. His work ethic wasn’t the best. Maybe now when Ovi (Alexander Ovechkin) will be without Semin, he could put more into hockey. Maybe that was also what the management intended.”

Your former colleague, Matt Bradley, said something similar about Semin and his work ethic and then he publicly apologized…

“But in my opinion this is nothing that isn’t public knowledge. If Semin wanted he could have been the best player in the world, but he just does not get motivated every day. And that’s wrong.”

When he finds out what you said, you may expect a hit on the head with the stick next time you play Carolina, don’t you think so?

(smiling) “Yes, that could happen, we play Carolina quite often.”

You also mentioned Ovechkin. Why isn’t he such a killer he was three/four years ago?

“He definitely isn’t what he used to be, that true. And if we as a team want to have a chance at the Stanley Cup, we need Ovi to be the best. We all expect it from him; as a captain he has to be a true leader. But it’s hard, as a player he has achieved everything, he was on the very top and then one can only fall down. I just hope that Ovi won’t continue falling; that he stops and maybe will try to get back on the top again. In terms of his attitude and locker room manners he is still the same. Even when he is not doing well, he is still in a good mood and celebrates with others. He is a real team player. He will stay like that forever.”

Another change in Capitals is the coach. Adam Oates, former forward and local celebrity, became the head coach. Are you as excited as the fans are about him?

“I haven’t met him in person yet but we talked on the phone and I felt good about it. He certainly is a big legend of Washington hockey, plus he was an assistant coach in New Jersey, against which I always played well, so I think that he has positive impression of me. It’s a new beginning with a new coach and I am happy for Oates. Also because Dale Hunter didn’t stay.”

Your teammate Roman Hamrlik wasn’t too happy about him either. What didn’t you like about him?

“Simply because Holtby was number one under him in the play-offs. Anyway, he never really made friends with him. He had a good relationship with Bruce (former coach Boudreau) and with the farm coach Bob Woods, but not with Hunter. I don’t know, he simply didn’t communicate with us goalies, in my opinion he also criticized us for nothing. From my standpoint, it is good that he left.”

Year after year Washington is one of the Stanley Cup hopefuls but for you it means that you are missing the chances to show off in the national team. You haven’t played in the seniors and Sochi Olympic games are approaching. Do you think about this?

“Absolutely. I was sorry, especially this year, that I couldn’t go to the world championship because we had an agreement with Mr. Hadamczik that I will come as soon as we are out of the play-offs. But we moved on, so nothing happened. It is difficult to get to the championship from NHL when you make it to the second round. I am now focusing on my club season, but it still holds that whenever I become available in the future and the national team is interested, I will immediately get on a plane and go.”

  • http://www.russianmachineneverbreaks.com/ Peter Hassett

    p.s. that translation cost me like 700 bucks.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jacobshapiro Jake Shapiro

    I love Neuvirth, but at the end of the day he really said what he said, and now he’s simply embarrassed the translation reached North America. And naturally, mainstream media trusts the player and his agent over RMNB.

  • JustARegular6-7Guy

    I love you guys and prefer to read sites like yours vs paid hacks like Adrian Dater. Keep up the great work!

  • http://twitter.com/ScionofFlame Adam

    Good on you guys for standing up for yourselves. I’m a Preds fan not a Caps fan, but seriously. Good on you. The Caps fanbase is lucky to have such a solid blog to turn to.

  • http://www.hockeygearhq.com/ Dirk Hoag

    Well done – now we’ll have to see if your critics have anything to say in response.

  • http://twitter.com/dave_gilmore Dave Gilmore

    Michal Neuvirth is a good goalie, and apparently, kind of a dick. Chuck Gormley is not a very engaging broadcaster, and apparently, kind of a dick. RMNB, as always, is not to be trifled with. Well done guys.

    EDIT: There are probably many other dicks involved here too, I just have a lot of college football to watch tonight and can’t name them all.

  • sean

    It all depends on what the definition of ‘is’ is.

  • Nat

    Excellently done guys. Sucks that you had to go in the hole financially to prove your credibility, which shouldn’t have been questioned anyways.

    I tip my hat to you.

  • http://twitter.com/vtcapsfan99 vtcapsfan99

    The Caps should have let Neuvy talk to the press and answer questions about the interview, instead of just talking to Vogel, who will do team PR. Gormley should have been more careful reporting about who exactly apologized to Neuvy. I read his article and to me it sounded like he meant RMNB.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jacobshapiro Jake Shapiro

    Totally agree.

  • SunshineStates

    Canucks fan here. Real proud of you guys for defending yourselves. In a large media market like Vancouver, you see PR moves all the time. Trying to sway opinion on comments or activities. Nice to see you guys stand strong. Good stuff.

  • http://twitter.com/priscillamay1 Priscilla Villanueva

    You guys shouldn’t have had ot prove your credibility

  • Dave at District Sports Page

    “It’s the paid professionals picking on volunteers because they can.”
    Unfortunately, this is the crux of the entire matter. I understand the team putting Neuvirth out there in English to preserve the reputation of the player within the organization and the market, but any error here was in the original Czech interview or with the player himself — though having interviewed Neuvirth on many instances the original attributed comments did seem awkward to me.
    But any organization that calls RMNB’s credibility or motives into question simply do not know you, are acting in their own selfish interested by taking shots at you, directly or implied, and not worthy of respect either way.
    Keep the faith.

  • http://twitter.com/priscillamay1 Priscilla Villanueva

    I’m sorry, my cat posted before I had a chance to make my complete thought. The complete thought is that you shouldn’t have to prove your credibility to the “media”. If anything, they proved your credibility by creating this big hullabaloo. So that’s a bright side. :-)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000342099792 Michael Blaesing

    TELL ‘EM!!!

  • http://twitter.com/TheRealWheatley JAMBO RUUKTI

    love you guys

  • The Peerless

    Peter, you and your colleagues knocked one out of the park with this statement. You’ve proven you have a place withe the big boys here, that you do the kind of work that can stand the scrutiny of the so-called fact checkers, who themselves aren’t reaching your standard. Well done.

  • Katherine

    Love this blog since I’ve found it. I hope the mainstream media folks keep in mind the fact that blogs kept hockey alive during the last lockout. And without them, hockey coverage would be scant in DC.

  • Tari

    You guys are the best! Keep on keepin’ on.

  • Bob

    Thanks for being an independent voice. I believe there are many like me who appreciate what you do.

  • Pingback: Neuvirth claims he received “apology” from Web site about Ovechkin, Holtby comments | ProHockeyTalk

  • http://twitter.com/TravisSBN Travis Hughes

    Keep kicking ass, guys. You handled this like pros.

  • Karen

    I think some of these “journalists” need to come take an ethics lesson from you guys. Well done. Way to handle it professionally.

  • zeron89

    Penguins fan here, so I hate you guys and vice versa. :P But awesome job in standing up for your blog, comments and yourself. Keep up the good work!

  • serpent

    Peter, this is why I keep coming to this blog for info and entertainment. You have integrity. I’d say :Hassett For President” but you’re way too honest for that job.

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