Self-dentistry FTW!

Friday night, the Washington Capitals lost to the Florida Panthers. It was the second meeting between the two teams this season, with the Capitals winning the other match-up 3-2 (SO) in early November at Verizon Center.

During the third period of Friday’s game, as Panthers forward Krys Barch dumped the puck into the Capitals zone, CSN’s Craig Laughlin had a question for play-by-play man Joe Beninati.

Didn’t Barch pull out his tooth in the first meeting… in the penalty box?” Laughlin asked.

“Yeah, I was never sure if he did that for real or if it was all a big joke,” Beninati responded with a laugh.

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Wheeee! Steve Oleksy Hip Checks Krys Barch (GIF)

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Photo credit: Greg Fiume

Late in the third period, Washington Capitals defenseman Steve Oleksy took a naughty, naughty retaliatory slashing penalty. The Florida Panthers’ Tomas Fleischmann scored on the resulting power play, pushing the game to overtime. It was a bad play, and Oleksy should have known better.

But Oleksy showed remarkable restraint and dexterity a bit earlier when weird ol’ Krys Barch tried to challenge every Capitals player on the ice to a fight. Instead of dropping the gloves, Oleksy did Barch one better. Binky ducked a hit (a late, charging hit) and flipped the psychotic enforcer end-over-end.

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Welp, can’t say I’ve ever seen this before.

Can the fans who Barch threw his tooth at please contact us ASAP?

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Evgeny Kuznetsov poses with George McPhee and Ross Mahoney (Photo: Bruce Bennett)

Each off-season I catch up on my reading. I alternate between a Bill James’ Abstract (I have 1984-1989 to get through); something music related (currently Straight Edge: Clean-Living Youth, Hardcore Punk, And Social Change and Precious Metal: Decibel Presents the Stories Behind 25 Extreme Metal Masterpieces); and one or two hockey books– including the new one called The Art of Scouting, which “delves into the secretive world of hockey prospecting.”

After only eleven pages, I got struck by what the authors claim is the consensus of a successful draft, summarized by Mike Futa, co-director of amateur scouting for the Los Angeles Kings:

“It’s the only job where you can be right 15 percent of the time and be ruled a Hall of Famer for success, You are going to be wrong 85 or 80 percent of the time, and if you hit on 2.5 home runs every Draft, you are par with some of the best scouts ever.”

Two NHLers out of seven players drafted, assuming no trades are made, seems like a low bar, so I decided to see how the George McPhee era has done in regards to scouting.

McPhee joined the Capitals in 1997, so the first draft we can attribute to him is in 1998. Since it takes about five years for a prospect to develop, we will look at his draft record from 1998-2006. Let’s consider a prospect a success if he has played in at least 200 games at the NHL level. That gives him five years of 40 games played to qualify.

Spoiler: The results are not great.

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